Week 42

Opera

Glyndebourne: Hamlet

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Finally, I got to see  one of the Hamlets I should have seen back in week 27, as the wonderful BBC broadcast the Glyndebournd production. I have to say that I don’t quite get the thrill from modern opera music as I do from “classic” arias and choruses. I find it literally impossible to distinguish the music in one modern opera from another. Having said that, I do notice the voices, and what was interesting in this production was the two countertenors playing Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Ophelia was a bit over-the-top in her madness, and I’m not sure it was necessary to put her in a scanty bikini. I liked Alan Clayton’s Hamlet very much. The set was grey. The costumes were grey. It worked. The splashes of blood were shocking against all that grey. I did like this production, even if there weren’t any standout songs.

Theatre

Young Vic: Wings

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This was brilliant. A short, no-interval play charting an older woman’s experience of and recovery from s stroke. The direction was inspired, and Juliet Stevenson was overwhelmingly good. How she managed to act while suspended on a wire for 90 minutes is beyond me. See this if you get a chance to.

Reading challenge

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One book this week, and not a brilliant one. I found the three-section three-narrators structure irritating, and the plot was clunky. I didn’t like the characters, and I was left dissatisfied, despite the no-loose-ends conclusion. Read it if you like lost-manuscript stories.

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Week 37

Theatre

Arts Theatre

Samuel Becket: Waiting for Godot

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This is a play I have waited for a long time to see. I dearly wished to see Sirs Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellan as Vladimir and Estragon, but that was not to be. This version was Irish through and through, and had some moments of comedy breaking up the bleakness. I found Pozzo and Lucky very irritating, but Didi and Gogo were excellent.

Once again, I found that I had been moved to a stalls seat (always a problem for me in these little theatres, as it usually involves negotiating a LOT of steps) because of a small audience. I really wish that theatres wouldn’t do this. And this time they were very high-handed about it -as if they are granting you the great privilege of paying £50 for a cold, noisy seat in a half-empty theatre.

The play itself was good,  but the cast must have been as fed up as the audience with the noise leaking in from the basement bar next door.  I can’t recommend this as a venue, sadly.

Art

Illustration Cupboard Gallery

David McKee: 50 Years of Mr Benn

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I like Mr Benn, and was pleased to see this exhibition.

The pictures were mostly straight from the books, with some animation cels. The gallery is very small and tightly packed. There were three other people in the main room when I was there, and it felt like a crowd.

IMG_0925My favourite item was a design especially commissioned by Turnbull and Asser (the tailor next door to the gallery).  It is Mr Benn as James Bond, and is going to be a silk pocket square that is sadly just too small to be used as a neck scarf. (I popped next door to enquire, just to be sure).

 

Week 32

This should have been an interesting week. I was going to see Titus Andronicus,  a Shakespeare play I have only ever seen excerpts of. In addition, it was the last week of the Opera in the City festival, and I had tickets for a couple of new pieces.

Sadly, life intervened, in the form of illness in the family, and I didn’t get to any    of the things I had booked. Once again, it was a couch culture week.

Musical Theatre/TV

BBC Proms

Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma!

 

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This was a lively, semi-staged version of an old favourite. A bright spot in a dark week.

 

SUMMER reading challenge

IMG_0502E is for Eco. This was a bit of a variable feast. In some parts, it was a fast and lively murder mystery; in others a tedious wade through pages of description or chapters of historical detail. I found it hard going, although the central story had me hooked. I might revisit this one day, as I am not sure I really did it the justice of  giving it my full attention.

 

 

Week 30

A quiet week in cultural terms. I was out quite a lot, but only in shopping centres. My opera, like my reading, took place on the sofa.

Opera/TV

BBC Proms

Beethoven: Fidelio

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This is Beethoven’s only opera, and I had high hopes. It was obviously concertised rather than staged, and had some good characterisation by the ingenue couple, Marzelline and Jaquino (Louise Adler and Benjamin Hulet). Stuart Skelton as Florestan was excellent, but the whole thing was let down by the supposed main character Leonore/Fidelio (Ricarda Merbeth), who screeched her way through the performance. James Cresswell did well as Rocco, particularly as he was a last-minute stand-in and was “on the book”. Sadly, I felt the ending was a bit limp, and I would have liked more chorus work.

SUMMER reading challenge

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Marra is the first of my two “M” authors. This book was not my usual fare, but I enjoyed it very much. The characters all go through nightmares of one sort or another, and I felt that these were real people undergoing real trials. We don’t get a happy ending all round, but in life, who does? I recommend this heartily.

Week 29

The cough is beginning to abate, St Swithin’s day was wet (always good news for me) and there have been some cooler days. Almost back to normal!

Theatre

Southwark Playhouse

Oliver Cotton: Dessert

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This play was sadly not as tasty as its poster promised it would be. It was a “rich man gets his comeuppance” drama that fell flat for me. The first act was ok, but I found the ending a little bit silly and very unsatisfying. I expected more from a play directed by Trevor Nunn.

Pop Culture

IMG_0289The new Dr Who has been unveiled as Jodie Whittaker. I am pleased that the show runners have finally chosen a woman to play this iconic role, but I do wish they’d gone a bit further out on their limb. I suppose a young, classically pretty, blonde white woman is a first baby step…

Books

SUMMER reading challenge

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This week’s author is Ugrešić, who has written an odd little three-section story. I chose this to try to widen my range of reading to (a) include more female writers, (2) read works from a wider range of cultures (in this case, Croatia), and (iii) include more “non-genre” titles.

Section one is a first-person narration of an uncomfortable mother/daughter relationship, from the point of view of the daughter. The second section seems completely unrelated – a sort of “road trip” undertaken by three women, none of whom seem to have any connection to anyone from the first section. The final section seems to be a long note from a translator/researcher to a publisher, detailing many aspects of the Baba Yaga stories in an almost-Wikipedia style, and relating them quite tenuously to sections one and two. Only at the end do we find out that the academic who has written this note is called Aba Bagay…

Other reading:

IMG_0291Bluets is a strange little thing. I bought it because it claimed to be about the author’s love of the colour blue, and because I have recently discovered a liking for the colour for myself after suffering many years of school-uniform induced blue-phobia.

I found the paragraph-numbering odd and not very consistent, and the continuous references to a lost lover irritating. Nelson refers to turquoise as a shade of blue (several times) , which is annoying because clearly, turquoise is an entirely separate colour.  I assumed the title was a made-up word; a term coined to describe “bits of blue”, and was actually quite disappointed to discover it is the name of a flower. I know other people like this a lot. It didn’t really do much for me, but don’t let that stop you reading it for yourself. You might love it.

Week 28

The cough persists, but is slowly receding, and fortunately leaving me enough time between bouts to be able to enjoy stuff without annoying my neighbours too much.

Theatre

Union Theatre

Tim Rice/Stephen Oliver: Blondel

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It seems that I am gradually coming round to an enjoyment of musicals. (Not all of them, though!)

Blondel is a very early Tim Rice offering, and was good fun, if a bit panto-ish. There were some outstanding moments, great voices, and some excellent characterisations, including the best Prince John since Alan Rickman.

The Union is a theatre best experienced in winter, I think. The summer heat inside this little railway arch was oppressive, and the seats are packed in with very little legroom. I was seated near a portable air-conditioner, which was noisy and didn’t do much to cool the air. On the plus side, the cafe is good, with lots of outside space.

Opera

ROH/ Big Screen

Puccini:Turandot

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These “big screenings” are an event with their own style. Picnic suppers, live-tweeting and singing lessons in the intervals.

I wasn’t able to get to the local Big Screen this time, and so missed my traditional Wimpy takeaway picnic,  but because it was a live stream, I was able to join in via my iPad, with a home-delivery KFC picnic on the sofa. (Sadly, Wimpy have not joined the home delivery market yet.)

Turandot is spectacularly problematic. One of the best arias ever in Nessun Dorma, but as bad in its treatment of women as you could find pretty much anywhere.

i live in hope that one day I will see a performance of this opera that does not use yellow-face. It must surely be possible to find Asian singers; or if not, to change the setting so it is not so obviously Chinese.

Ballet

ROH/BBC4

Wayne McGregor: Woolf Works

IMG_0515I confess to not being a ballet lover. I like some dance, but generally speaking, big ballets leave me fairly cold.  Having said that, occasionally one will catch me out. This week the BBC broadcast a live-ish production of Woolf Works from the Royal Opera House, and I was captivated. The music was modern, costumes were beautiful, design was excellent and the dancers were wonderful. i particularly liked the middle Orlando section,  and this has spurred me to download a copy of the book to add to my to-read list.

 

Theatre/Cinema

Donmar/Picturehouse

Shakespeare: Julius Caesar

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Okay, so not live, but this film of Julius Caesar from the Donmar was one of the highlights of my cultural year so far. Outstanding performances by Harriet Walter as Brutus and Martina Laird as Cassius; some inspired design/props elements (particularly the red rubber gloves); and a bit of hard rock music, too. The use of a prison setting, and its incorporation into the play was clever, and the all-female, multi-ethnic casting was well-justified. I loved this, and recommend it to anyone, Shakespeare lover or not.

Books

SUMMER reading challenge

I decided to just read these one a week in the order they come, so, first up for this week was St Aubyn.

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There is a lot of hype about this author, and the book is certainly readable. It is also mercifully short, because the subject matter is shocking. I couldn’t understand why so much praise had been heaped on it, until I did a bit of research and discovered that it was autobiographical. That put a very different complexion on the story, and pushed me into buying the other four books in the series.

 

The rest of the Patrick Melrose series kept me occupied while I suffered with the lingering cough that stopped me sleeping this week.  I found this whole series bleak and populated with really unlikeable people. Thankfully, there is redemption at the very end of the last book.

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