Posted in Musical theatre

June 3: Into the Woods

I am very partial to a Sondheim musical, and Into the Woods is a particular favourite. I hadn’t been to the Cockpit before, and was pleasantly surprised by its reasonably comfy seats (certainly no less comfy than the New Vic) and the particular care taken over settling anyone with mobility problems into their seats first, so they didn’t have to stand in the first-come-first-served queue.

The production was staged in the round, with clever use of builders’ pallets and ladders to represent the woods. The entire central space was strewn several inches thick with wood chippings, which looked (and smelled) effective, but raised quite a lot of dust ( that had to be sprayed with water to damp it down during the interval.

The cast was large, with no doubling up on roles. The Witch was very strong, as was Cinderella. The Princes were princely, charming and funny. Little Red Riding Hood was outstanding. The only disappointment in terms of singing was Jack’s Mother, who was singing at the very bottom (and sometimes off the bottom end of) her range, and so wasn’t able to achieve the volume needed to match the other voices. She made up for it with her acting skills, giving us a picture of a woman flattened by poverty, briefly lifted by a windfall. A very moving performance.

Props were minimal, and clever, with no attempt to make them realistic, but I think the various babies should have been slightly larger.

This might not have been the most “polished” of performances, but it was a cheerful way to spend a Sunday afternoon.

Advertisements
Posted in books

Week 52

Last entry for 2017. No cultural outings this week – a quiet Christmas, followed by a sick in-between week wherein I am fairly sure I poisoned myself and various family members.

I finished my Reading Challenge!

img_0478Some highlights from the list: Yellow Blue Tibia – probably the best pun in a title ever; King Dido -a historical crime novel I would recommend to anyone; The Night Sessions, excellent SciFiCri.

I won some audio books, all Maigret stories, and listened to some of them; I read a few graphic novels, and some children’s books, including The Dark Is Rising, which I wasn’t supposed to finish until the new year, but I couldn’t resist.

I finally got to grips with Virginia Woolf and Sylvia Plath, and made a dent in the Dickens backlog. There were six cookbooks, and three books I bought because I didn’t think I would get to see the plays based on them, and then actually did get to see them all . There was a new Donna Leon, a new Dave Hutchinson, a new Christopher Fowler, a new Jo Nesbo and a new Ragnar Jonasson (do you detect that I like a crime story?)

Finally, there were two new Hogarth Shakespeares, based on Othello and King Lear.

It was a real challenge to read 100 books this year, as well as keep up my weekly culture outing. Next year’s challenges will be simpler, I think.

Posted in books, pop culture, Theatre

Week 29

The cough is beginning to abate, St Swithin’s day was wet (always good news for me) and there have been some cooler days. Almost back to normal!

Theatre

Southwark Playhouse

Oliver Cotton: Dessert

IMG_0568

This play was sadly not as tasty as its poster promised it would be. It was a “rich man gets his comeuppance” drama that fell flat for me. The first act was ok, but I found the ending a little bit silly and very unsatisfying. I expected more from a play directed by Trevor Nunn.

Pop Culture

IMG_0289The new Dr Who has been unveiled as Jodie Whittaker. I am pleased that the show runners have finally chosen a woman to play this iconic role, but I do wish they’d gone a bit further out on their limb. I suppose a young, classically pretty, blonde white woman is a first baby step…

Books

SUMMER reading challenge

IMG_0287

This week’s author is Ugrešić, who has written an odd little three-section story. I chose this to try to widen my range of reading to (a) include more female writers, (2) read works from a wider range of cultures (in this case, Croatia), and (iii) include more “non-genre” titles.

Section one is a first-person narration of an uncomfortable mother/daughter relationship, from the point of view of the daughter. The second section seems completely unrelated – a sort of “road trip” undertaken by three women, none of whom seem to have any connection to anyone from the first section. The final section seems to be a long note from a translator/researcher to a publisher, detailing many aspects of the Baba Yaga stories in an almost-Wikipedia style, and relating them quite tenuously to sections one and two. Only at the end do we find out that the academic who has written this note is called Aba Bagay…

Winner of the 2010 James Tiptree Award

Other reading:

IMG_0291Bluets is a strange little thing. I bought it because it claimed to be about the author’s love of the colour blue, and because I have recently discovered a liking for the colour for myself after suffering many years of school-uniform induced blue-phobia.

I found the paragraph-numbering odd and not very consistent, and the continuous references to a lost lover irritating. Nelson refers to turquoise as a shade of blue (several times) , which is annoying because clearly, turquoise is an entirely separate colour.  I assumed the title was a made-up word; a term coined to describe “bits of blue”, and was actually quite disappointed to discover it is the name of a flower. I know other people like this a lot. It didn’t really do much for me, but don’t let that stop you reading it for yourself. You might love it.