Posted in Opera

March 31: Coraline

Let me start by saying how much I loved the Barbican Theatre. This was my first visit, and I found the separate doors for each row entrancing. I loved the live video feed of the audience, and it was amusing to see other audience members waving to themselves. The air conditioning was a little fierce, but that bodes well for the summer.

The opera was a little shaky for my taste. I wasn’t really overwhelmed by any of the singers, and I thought the inventor father was a bit silly. I liked Kitty Whately as the mother/other mother, and her bad cold didn’t seem to affect her performance. The music was typical Turnage – no “tunes” for the many children in the audience to take away and sing, and I wish there had been a cat.

The set was clever and made full use of the revolve stage, although I didn’t understand the significance of the large hole in the ceiling.

Overall, it was an enjoyable experience.

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Posted in books

Week 52

Last entry for 2017. No cultural outings this week – a quiet Christmas, followed by a sick in-between week wherein I am fairly sure I poisoned myself and various family members.

I finished my Reading Challenge!

img_0478Some highlights from the list: Yellow Blue Tibia – probably the best pun in a title ever; King Dido -a historical crime novel I would recommend to anyone; The Night Sessions, excellent SciFiCri.

I won some audio books, all Maigret stories, and listened to some of them; I read a few graphic novels, and some children’s books, including The Dark Is Rising, which I wasn’t supposed to finish until the new year, but I couldn’t resist.

I finally got to grips with Virginia Woolf and Sylvia Plath, and made a dent in the Dickens backlog. There were six cookbooks, and three books I bought because I didn’t think I would get to see the plays based on them, and then actually did get to see them all . There was a new Donna Leon, a new Dave Hutchinson, a new Christopher Fowler, a new Jo Nesbo and a new Ragnar Jonasson (do you detect that I like a crime story?)

Finally, there were two new Hogarth Shakespeares, based on Othello and King Lear.

It was a real challenge to read 100 books this year, as well as keep up my weekly culture outing. Next year’s challenges will be simpler, I think.

Posted in books, Gigs, Musical theatre, Theatre

Week 51

It’s Christmas!

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In the week up to Christmas Eve, there was enough seasonal entertainment to exhaust the most hardened pleasure seeker…

Theatre

Wilton’s Music Hall

Piers Torday: The Box Of Delights

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This was a vastly chopped-about version of the story, and was rather difficult for younger children to understand. Some elements were slapstick, some were very frightening indeed, and all were over-acted. The set was clever, and there was some imaginative use of puppets and projection, but overall, the whole thing was grey and misty, and not just from the over-use of haze. I had hoped to be entranced, but it didn’t quite happen.

Gigs that don’t quite fit into categories

Conway Hall

Robin Ince: Nine Lessons and Carols for Godless People

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This was a fast-moving but strangely over-running variety show, full of science, comedy , music and a man cooking eggs with a wallpaper steamer. Oddly, this show was the most Christmassy thing I saw this week.  I laughed a lot.

O2 Arena

Disney on Ice:Passport to Adventure

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What it says on the tin. Disney characters on skates. Some of it was good, some a bit long-winded. The Peter Pan section could have been chopped in half without losing anything, and there was room for a bit more Frozen.  It was fun. Children in the audience loved it. I had a problem with the expensive and ridiculous merchandising, but I suppose that’s what it was really all about.

Books

Reading Challenge 

Two more this week, bringing my total up to 96

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I am reading a lot of children’s books lately. (Deciding what to buy young relatives for Christmas is difficult!) I had heard good things about the Velveteen Rabbit, but I was a little disappointed in it. I wanted to learn more about the Skin Horse. I wanted the rabbit to have more trials to overcome. I suppose I wanted a book for the 10 year old me…

Mr Penumbra irritated me intensely. It is ostensibly about a bookshop, but is actually about a Dungeons and Dragons style quest without the dragons, and with added computer nerdery. Not a classic.

#thedarkisreading

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I have never read the Dark is Rising, so this year I joined a Twitter reading group to do it properly. The book begins on Midwinter’s eve, which happened to fall this week. This book won’t be part of my 100-books Challenge, because I don’t plan to finish it before New Year. So far, I am enjoying being part of a pretty large community of readers. Other people’s perspectives are really interesting.

Posted in Ballet, Cinema, exhibitions, Gigs, pop culture

Week 43

A busy week this week.

Ballet

Royal Opera House Live/ Odeon Cinema: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

FullSizeRenderI love that the big companies live-stream events. The cost of good seats at the Opera House is prohibitive, and I wouldn’t be able to see nearly as many ballets, operas etc as I do. This production of Alice is contemporary, bright, and features a brilliantly comedic Red Queen, a clever puppet Cheshire Cat and a lively tap-dancing Mad Hatter. Brilliant fun, and local, too.

Gigs

The O2 Arena: Metallica

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I looooove a big rock gig, and they don’t come much bigger than Metallica.
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The support act were impressive. A Norwegian band called Kvelertak, whose singer appeared on stage with an owl on his head.

IMG_1046Metallica were amazing, as always, and I thoroughly enjoyed both the old and the new songs. I got the chance to wear a pop culture icon – the leather biker jacket, and to sing ( or shout) along with some of my old favourites.

The British Library: Tiger Lillies

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This little gig was a jewel.  I really like this band, and this was a chance to hear their album Cold Night In Soho played live for the last time ever. The British Library was a strange venue for a gig – more on that later.

Other events

The British Library: Harry Potter – A History of Magic

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This was the British Library’s late night event celebrating J K Rowling’s creation and the history of “magic” in general. The exhibition was well laid out, and the Harry Potter theme certainly drew in a crowd. My focus was the Tiger Lillies gig, which formed part of the evening’s entertainment, but I did come away with a Slytherin scarf.

Posted in Ballet, books, video

Week 20

This week, I was trapped at home by disappearing bus stops. The two stops I use were out of service because of road workings. Only temporarily, but annoyingly, including  a day that I had intended to go to the theatre. This week was consequently quiet, and my culture was of the armchair variety.

Video/ Online

English National Ballet: Curing Albrecht

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This was a lovely little thing. Short and sweet, and a lot of fun. I loved the old Victorian baths it was filmed in. All those tiles, all that cast iron. And water! And stripey swimwear! Do take a few minutes to watch. It will cool you down on a hot day.

Books

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I occasionally buy a play script if I am not going to be able to see a play (and if it is not available on video). I had intended to see All Our Children this week, but wasn’t able to get there. I bought an e-copy of the script before I had a message from the theatre that they could offer me a transfer to another day (hooray!), so now I will be familiar with the play before I see it staged. I wouldn’t say it was enjoyable, but it was thought-provoking. I’ll say more when I have seen the play.

I’m working toward my reading challenge goal of 100 books by the end of the year. As part of the challenge, I make myself read books I should have read years ago. This week, I suffered through two. Pippi Longstocking must be the most irritating child ever imagined. I loathed her, and I can’t imagine that I would have liked her any better if I had encountered her as a child. The Bell Jar was disappointing. I don’t know exactly what I was expecting, but whatever it was, I didn’t get it. The book was readable, and contained some truly shocking moments, but I wanted “great” literature, and for me, this fell short. My final book this week was written by a Nobel prize winner. A shortish novel, heavily allegorical and with an anthropomorphic personification. An interesting read, not too heavy, with a predictable ending. I’d be interested in reading more by Saramago.