February 18: Reading Challenge

Just a catch -up. Categories are difficult, as I seem to read quite a lot of crossovers of genre. My best attempt is here. I’m almost halfway to my goal and it’s only February.

So far this year, I have only read one real stinker of a book, and it is by Wilbur Smith, who ought to have been ashamed of himself for writing such trash.

I revisited some old favourites. Notably, Ursula Le Guin’s Left Hand of Darkness (an interesting take on gender which sadly sidesteps the issue of male power in relationships); and the first three of Terry Pratchett’s City Watch books (the rest are on my to-read list), which feature the wonderfully human Sam Vimes.

I have mentioned my growing enjoyment of graphic novels in other posts, so I won’t go into them here, apart from mentioning that six of my 21 books so far are in that format. Quite a big proportion, hugely outweighing the proportion that are classics.

The biggest proportion is crime, and if I include all the crossovers, half of all my reading so far this year is crime. I always thought of myself as a sci-fi buff, but maybe I need to rethink that.

Crime fiction




Science Fiction


Fantasy crime


Classic novel


Historical novel


SciFi Crime


AU crime graphic novel


Historical graphic novel


Poetry SciFi novel


Psychological thriller



February 4: The Death of Stalin


This is the book that inspired the recent and quite brilliant film. It is a worthy addition to my graphic novels shelf, being clever, believable and well drawn. I thoroughly enjoyed revisiting this story, and chuckled quietly to myself. It is very slightly subtler than the film, and didn’t give me so many laugh-out-loud moments, but it did make me appreciate the characters more.

January 18: The Man Who Laughs


Having seen the musical play “The Grinning Man”, I decided to read the book it was based on. Victor Hugo’s works are available for free from iBooks, so I downloaded a copy and settled in for what turned out to be a very bleak ride.

Like many “period” authors (Melville, Dickens and the like), Hugo indulges himself in lengthy descriptive passages, and whole chapters of what seem to be lists of the peerage. I found the book to be a difficult read because of this, and caught myself skipping sections in order to get on with the story.

There is a (thankfully not too detailed) description of the surgical procedures used on Gwynplaine, and a quite horrible account of his reception by his peers towards the end of the book. The actual ending shocked me, and was quite different from the ending of the play.



January 3rd: Reading

Last year I wrote about almost everything I read. This year, I’m only going to mention things I have really liked.

So, to start the year, I treated myself to a full set of Bryan Talbot’s Grandeville graphic novels.

I loved these books. I gave them 5 stars on Goodreads, and wished I could have given them more. They are beautifully drawn, and full of Easter eggs that made me smile each time I spotted one. Asterix and Obelix make a brief appearance. Tintin’s dog Snowy features in one of the books. And there are bears. Paddington Bear. Rupert Bear. Gladly the Cross-Eyed Bear (!)

If you don’t know these stories, imagine a mashup of Sherlock Holmes and Inspector Lestrade (the Rupert Graves version); add in an alternate history setting and a steampunk style. Oh, and the lead character is a badger.

It sounds weird. It is a bit weird, but not as weird as you’d think. There are some very bad villains (I won’t spoil it by telling you just who the worst villain turns out to be), and some clueless coppers. There is also a LOT of gory death. This is not a children’s comic.

The five books form a story arc, which is completed at the end of the final book. I want more though, and I hope that sometime in the future, Archie LeBrock will return.