Week 49

It’s snowing!

Theatre

Jermyn Street Theatre

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, adapted by Steven Canny and John Nicholson: The Hound of the Baskervilles

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This was a comedy romp. Three actors playing all the parts, no set, but lots of foggy haze. It was a fun afternoon, but oh, such a cold day. I found myself almost onstage, having to wrap my scarf around my face to help with the enormous amount of haze, and to keep my neck warm in what seemed to be an unheated auditorium. I enjoyed the play, but would have preferred proper melodrama to farce.

Ballet

ROH Live: The Nutcracker

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It isn’t Christmas without a Nutcracker, and this was a lovely production. Seeing it up close via a live broadcast made a great difference to the experience. You can see facial expressions and costume and set details that might be missed in the theatre.

Popular culture

London Christmas Lights

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The Regent Street lights are beautiful, without the tacky commercialism of recent years. A pity it was so cold, or I would have walked to Trafalgar Square to see the tree. I did take a picture from the bus, which shows the lights.I wish that the style of lighting was better. This years tree looks rather like a giant cactus.

Reading Challenge

Three books this week, bringing my total to 87.

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Archangel is the latest offering from one of my very favourite authors. An alternate-reality dystopia with a bit of time travel thrown in. It is a graphic novel, which is a new direction for Gibson, and works very well.

The other two are seasonal titles, and they would fit very well on my winter shelf. The Advent Killer isn’t really an Advent killer at all, and was so full of tropes and false reveals that I stopped taking it seriously halfway through. And I guessed the killer.

The new Nigel Slater is wonderful. He keeps to his style of writing around the recipes, and sets the scene for the season very nicely.

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Week 48

Advent begins, the decorations go up, I dig out my playlists of Christmas tunes, and start my yearly quest to see as many versions of Dickens’s A Christmas Carol as I can.

Theatre

The Old Vic

Charles Dickens, adapted by Jack Thorne: A Christmas Carol

This was a beautiful, wonderful production, with some excellent moments, from the mince pies and oranges given away at the start of the show by Victorian street sellers, through the brilliantly over-the-top weight of Marley’s chains to the beautiful snowfalls during the second act. There was some mucking about with the text, but nothing that harmed the story. Go if you get the chance.

Books

Time to dust off my winter shelf.

Reading challenge

Two books this week, bringing my total to 84.

99 Red Balloons was a little confusing. I felt there were to many PsOV, and it was difficult to remember what was happening when. The villain was a surprise, I must admit, but I think more could have been made of the song the book was named for.

The second book was another of my prize audiobooks. This was one I had seen as an adaptation for TV, so I was listening out for differences between the two versions. I have discovered a liking for audiobooks, which surprises me.

Week 47

Ooh, it’s getting cold…

Opera

Metropolitan Opera live in cinema

Thomas Adès: The Exterminating Angel

This is an opera I couldn’t afford to see at the ROH. Luckily, the Met performance was the same production, conducted by the composer, which was a bonus. The opera was another of those modern ones with no memorable “tunes”, but a lot of very difficult, very very high soprano singing, and some wonderful musical moments (a room full of drummers; a string section of miniature violins; a lot of bells). The story is odd, a surrealist nightmare, and I enjoyed it very much.

Theatre

The Puppet Theatre Barge

Wendy Cope: The River Girl

I really enjoy puppetry, and this production was lovely – some beautiful underwater scenes, and a literally breathtaking opening when a huge wave of haze rolled out over the audience. I found some of the puppetry a little clunky (the puppeteer working John Didde didn’t seem to have mastered the art of making a marionette kneel, for instance), but the use of narrative poetry was clever, and I came away from the boat very happy.

Reading Challenge

This is moving ahead slowly. I like Ragnar Jonasson’s Dark Iceland series, and this book brings me up to date with that. I find it odd reading books that have been translated out of order, and I am still very irritated with Ari Thor Arason, but that is part of the experience. No spoilers here – I recommend these books.

Week 46

Had a cold, and a nasty lingering cough. I should have gone to a couple of galleries (Dulwich for Tove Jansen and the Tate for Rachel Whiteread), but didn’t really feel up to the effort. Was feeling a bit better by the end of the week, so did manage a trip to the theatre.

The Young Vic

Aeschylus: The Suppliant Women

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I enjoyed this very much, and was pleased to see the Greek theatre traditions in play, including the libation to Bacchus at the beginning of the play. There was a lot of haze, and a lot of actual smoke from lamps and flaming torches, which didn’t help my poor lungs, but did add enormously to the atmosphere of what seemed a very contemporary play.

 

Reading challenge

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Sjón is lauded for his strange novels. The Blue Fox was very short (I read the whole thing during one insomniac night), but very clever, with a magical edge to what could have been a very bleak tale. I shall read more of his work, I think.

My total of books read this year now stands at 82. Will I get to 100? I have 6 weeks…

 

Week 45

A cold week. A visit to the cinema for an actual film (not a live-broadcast), and a brand new theatre to enjoy.

Theatre

The Bridge

Clive Coleman and Richard Bean: Young Marx

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IMG_1115I like this new theatre very much. Very stylish.  Fizzy water (free) on tap, is a nice touch, and warm madeleines in the interval were a joy on the cold day. The play was good, if not the “riotous comedy” promised by the advertising.  Rory Kinnear was good, of course,and the rest of the cast were strong. There was a running “Engels and Marx” musical joke which made me smile.

Cinema

Armando Iannucci: The Deathof Stalin

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I absolutely loved this film. Brilliant performances by everyone, especially Simon Russell Beale as Lavrentiy Beria ( who for some reason isn’t on the poster). There was a nice little surprise of a cameo by Tom Brooke, one of my favourite actors, in the opening and closing sequences, and the comedy was dark and very funny.  I need to get the video of this and watch it again  I’m sure I missed some of the jokes.

Reading Challenge

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Continuing the Russian theme, I downloaded the second in Simon Sebag Montefiore’s “Moscow Trilogy”. One Night in Winter is a better read than Sashenka was, and the connection between the books  is rather vague until Benya Golden appears. I ended up rather looking to the third in the series, which is on my wish list.

Week 44

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This week contained Guy Fawkes Night (aka Fireworks night, or for the more traditionally minded, Bonfire Night), when we in the UK celebrate the fact that the Gunpowder Plot of 1605 failed.  There are some huge public displays of fireworks in London, and one of the biggest is quite local to me. But I didn’t go to watch fireworks, as I was busy doing other things.

Theatre

National Theatre

Rory Mullarkey: Saint George and the Dragon

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This was a straightforward allegory (if there can be such a thing) of Brexit, ending with the cast and audience uncertain of what should happen next. There were some fun moments – the flaming dragon heads crashing down in fabulous pyrotechnic display; the clever origin of the St George’s cross on a flag. The set was very original, and made good use of the Olivier’s revolving stage. I think the time-jumping aspect of the story could have been managed better, but overall, I enjoyed this play.

Garrick Theatre

Mel Brooks: Young Frankenstein

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This was, as expected, full of “knobs and knockers” jokes, but having said that, it was very funny, even if I did find myself thinking “oh dear, I shouldn’t be laughing at this” more than once. The performances were strong, and there were some very clever scenic elements. The cart-horses were particularly inspired, and whoever thought that idea up should get a medal.

Reading challenge

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A trip into science fiction territory this week. I enjoy Adam Roberts’s quirky takes on the future, and this married my old love of SF with my new love of the crime thriller, by providing me with a locked door mystery that I didn’t solve, but could have, if I had though laterally. Clever stuff, but I would have liked more character  back story. My total of books read this year now stands at 80. Can I make it to 100? Watch this space…

 

 

 

 

Week 43

A busy week this week.

Ballet

Royal Opera House Live/ Odeon Cinema: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

 

FullSizeRenderI love that the big companies live-stream events. The cost of good seats at the Opera House is prohibitive, and I wouldn’t be able to see nearly as many ballets, operas etc as I do. This production of Alice is contemporary, bright, and features a brilliantly comedic Red Queen, a clever puppet Cheshire Cat and a lively tap-dancing Mad Hatter. Brilliant fun, and local, too.

Gigs

The O2 Arena: Metallica

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I looooove a big rock gig, and they don’t come much bigger than Metallica.
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The support act were impressive. A Norwegian band called Kvelertak, whose singer appeared on stage with an owl on his head.

IMG_1046Metallica were amazing, as always, and I thoroughly enjoyed both the old and the new songs. I got the chance to wear a pop culture icon – the leather biker jacket, and to sing ( or shout) along with some of my old favourites.

 

The British Library: Tiger Lillies

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This little gig was a jewel.  I really like this band, and this was a chance to hear their album Cold Night In Soho played live for the last time ever. The British Library was a strange venue for a gig – more on that later.

Other events

The British Library: Harry Potter – A History of Magic

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This was the British Library’s late night event celebrating J K Rowling’s creation and the history of “magic” in general. The exhibition was well laid out, and the Harry Potter theme certainly drew in a crowd. My focus was the Tiger Lillies gig, which formed part of the evening’s entertainment, but I did come away with a Slytherin scarf.

 

Week 42

Opera

Glyndebourne: Hamlet

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Finally, I got to see  one of the Hamlets I should have seen back in week 27, as the wonderful BBC broadcast the Glyndebournd production. I have to say that I don’t quite get the thrill from modern opera music as I do from “classic” arias and choruses. I find it literally impossible to distinguish the music in one modern opera from another. Having said that, I do notice the voices, and what was interesting in this production was the two countertenors playing Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Ophelia was a bit over-the-top in her madness, and I’m not sure it was necessary to put her in a scanty bikini. I liked Alan Clayton’s Hamlet very much. The set was grey. The costumes were grey. It worked. The splashes of blood were shocking against all that grey. I did like this production, even if there weren’t any standout songs.

Theatre

Young Vic: Wings

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This was brilliant. A short, no-interval play charting an older woman’s experience of and recovery from s stroke. The direction was inspired, and Juliet Stevenson was overwhelmingly good. How she managed to act while suspended on a wire for 90 minutes is beyond me. See this if you get a chance to.

Reading challenge

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One book this week, and not a brilliant one. I found the three-section three-narrators structure irritating, and the plot was clunky. I didn’t like the characters, and I was left dissatisfied, despite the no-loose-ends conclusion. Read it if you like lost-manuscript stories.

Week 41

Last week, I saw The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, wherein the female lead begins as a singer at Wilton’s music hall. By strange coincidence, I was at Wilton’s myself this week, and a wonderful place it is, too.

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Wilton’s Music Hall

Les Enfants Terribles: The Terrible Infants

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IMG_1018The play in question was a sort-of musical, a little like the offspring of  Shockheaded Peter and Oyster Boy might be, if you can imagine that.

The actor-musicians were very good. The story was pretty much what I expected – cautionary tales aimed for a mixed audience. A lot of the action was through ingenious puppetry, which was excellent. The theatre space was fabulous. Seating was more comfortable than I expected, and I had a jolly good time. The only downside was the awful walk from Shadwell along Cable Street. A warning to fellow pedestrians – go via Aldgate East and Leman Street. It won’t be much quicker, but it will be more pleasant.

Reading Challenge

I haven’t managed to actually read anything this week, but I did win a competition to win what I thought was one audio book, but which turned out to be three audio books.

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Week 40

A very sad week.

A couple of theatre trips had been booked a while ago, and I decided not to cancel, as I needed to think about something other than sorrow and regrets.

Greenwich Theatre

Blackeyed Theatre: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

DCB12581-CC2F-4D66-8BB5-A5C6BFD68E7DThe first “Goth” offering in this Halloween season was a well-designed, well acted, old fashioned melodrama. The small cast played multiple roles very well, and the set design was a delightful reworking of a pile of junk shop furniture. Red lighting was used cleverly, suggesting threat and blood. I enjoyed this, and was glad I had decided not to cancel.

The London Theatre

Harry Denford: Joy Division
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This venue has a very grand name for a theatre no bigger than my living room in a New Cross basement.  Unsurprisingly, there was no scenery- the wooden floor and a door were the whole set, and at times, the actors  were uncomfortably up close and personal with the audience. This short play was a powerful depiction of the horror of the “Joy Division” – the women used as whores for the Nazi officers.  It was grim, and thought-provoking. I can’t say I enjoyed it, exactly, but it did not leave me unmoved.