Week 34

Went for a walk in the park this week.

Galleries

Serpentine Gallery

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-I had been looking forward to this exhibition for a long time, and I wasn’t disappointed. There was a bit of everything, and I was particularly pleased to see the “Brexit” vases, as I had been following the process of their production on TV and various social media.

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I particularly like Perry’s large tapestries. Last time I went to an exhibition of his work I treated myself to a set of plates with images from his “Map of Days“. This time I treated myself to a silk scarf depicting his “Red Carpet“.

Water Features

This is a new category for this blog, but there are a lot of these about, so it’s worth mentioning any of note.

Hyde Park: The Diana Princess of Wales Memorial Fountain; The Italian Gardens; Two Bears drinking fountain.

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My picture shows the water on show in one small part of the park. I liked the Italian gardens, with their very formal lily ponds and fountains; I liked the quiet end of the Serpentine, away from the boats and crowds; I liked the two little bears hugging each other on the drinking fountain, which I was surprised to find actually working.

I really did not like the Princess Diana fountain. It seemed to be not much more than a paddling pond, and was full of people when I was there. Maybe I might have liked it more up close. But I would have been giving myself a hill to climb back up on a hot day, so I took my picture from a distance.

Public Art

Hyde Park has two of the most famous and least inspiring statues in London, and I can’t leave this blog without mentioning both of them.

img_0679Peter Pan is famous, and I am a little ashamed that I hadn’t seen this statue before. Now that I have seen it, I have to ask what all the fuss is about. It is the sort of thing that you might find in your auntie Maud’s garden ( if it was a little smaller). I think it counts as an example of ghastly art.

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The Albert Memorial is truly awful. I shudder every time I see it. It was marginally better before it was cleaned up and re-gilded. I’m just pleased that it does not lie on any of my regular routes through London, and that I don’t have to see it too often.

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Week 33

An interesting mix of things this week.

Opera

Arcola Theatre: Grimeborne Festival

Kurt Schwitters/Lewis Coenen-Rowe: Collision

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This is described as part sci-fi, part Weimar-decadence, and is a short ( hour and a half straight through) opera, set in prewar Berlin, with an end-of-the-world plot involving a large green globe on a collision course with earth. I have to say, there wasn’t much sci-fi to be had, and perplexingly, all the lighting effects were blue and red. So, no sign of a green globe,  but there was a bit of Cabaret-style decadence. Casting a high soprano as the (male) chief of police was odd, especially as the soprano was scantily clad in a thankfully well-engineered red brassiere. The other voices were strong, apart from the inevitable weak tenor. The music was performed by a live band, and was very good. The set design and costumes looked very amateurish, but this was possibly deliberate. Overall, this was an enjoyable performance, well up to fringe standards

 

Tod Machover: VALIS

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This is another short, sci-fi opera, based on the VALIS novels by Philip K Dick, and available to download free.

I really liked this, even if I didn’t fully understand it. You can make your own judgement-  read more and listen to it here

 

Literature

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On August 15th, 1947, India was partitioned and Pakistan was born. To commemorate this, the BBC broadcast a dramatised adaptation of Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children. I binge-listened to all seven episodes on August 15th 2017.

I had read the novel, quite a few years ago, and liked it. I liked this version too.

SUMMER reading challenge

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The challenge comes to a successful early conclusion with R for Runcie. This is the fourth Sidney Chambers book, and one in which the female characters have become particularly grating. I go on reading these in the hope that something dire will happen to Amanda, Helena or the irritating Hildegard.

Week 32

This should have been an interesting week. I was going to see Titus Andronicus,  a Shakespeare play I have only ever seen excerpts of. In addition, it was the last week of the Opera in the City festival, and I had tickets for a couple of new pieces.

Sadly, life intervened, in the form of illness in the family, and I didn’t get to any    of the things I had booked. Once again, it was a couch culture week.

Musical Theatre/TV

BBC Proms

Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma!

 

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This was a lively, semi-staged version of an old favourite. A bright spot in a dark week.

 

SUMMER reading challenge

IMG_0502E is for Eco. This was a bit of a variable feast. In some parts, it was a fast and lively murder mystery; in others a tedious wade through pages of description or chapters of historical detail. I found it hard going, although the central story had me hooked. I might revisit this one day, as I am not sure I really did it the justice of  giving it my full attention.

 

 

Week 31

This week’s cultural outings took me to the Isle of Dogs and Blackfriars, both parts of London better known for commerce than art. Both were fringe performances, both tiny venues and tiny casts, both biographical accounts.

Theatre

The Space

New Diorama Theatre: 12 Million Volts

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This was an interesting account of the life of Nikola Tesla, performed with a lot of fast-paced physicality by the cast of three men and one woman, who interestingly, did most of the heavy lifting in the show. There was some very clever use of lighting, including backlighting and projection on a bubble-wrap screen – something I hadn’t seen before. I enjoyed the play, but was disappointed that there was no sign of a Tesla coil.

Opera

Bridewell Theatre: Opera in the City Festival

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My first “festival gig” was the second biography this week:

Andrew Bain: Lanza

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This was less an opera than a monologue with arias. It was sung very well by Andrew Bain, who is clearly a Mario Lanza fan. I like a good tenor voice, and this was very enjoyable, despite a very distracting shirt-buttoning mishap in the first act.

 

SUMMER book challenge

My second “M” is Montefiore.

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I like a tale of Russian intrigue, so I was looking forward to reading this.

It was okay. An easy read, a fairly obvious ending, but I didn’t warm to Sashenka at all, and I didn’t really like the neat way it was all tied up at the end. A bit disappointing, as the author is so lauded.